New boho bag arrivals just in time for summer!

Summer has arrived! It’s been long anticipated but here at The Stellar Boutique we’ve been working around the clock, jet setting to warmer climates in order to provide our customers with an abundant collection of gorgeous bohemian bags just in time for the festival season! Each of our individual and diversely versatile boho bags have been authentically sited in the souks of the enchanted city of Marrakech, all individually hand crafted and unique – their authenticity cannot be found anywhere on the High Street!

Our new installment of boho bags, like all of our existing boho products at The Stellar Boutique, represent Moroccan culture in its entirety and have been sourced with our customers in mind! All genuine leather, these bags are the real article, with vintage style saddle bags that have been studded and laser cut totally by hand and diminutive satchels and rucksacks that have adorned in Moroccan kilim tribal carpet, with designs tailored specifically for us.

We look to give our customers something different and love to go that extra mile, finding on trend bohemian pieces that have been uniquely hand tooled and decorated with fashion forward pieces that can be used for seasons to come!

We’ve truly outdone ourselves with our latest boho bag collection, bringing a vast collection of diverse silhouettes for every occasion, decorated with studs and pigmented stones, tribal in design and excessive Berber fringing and made exclusively from soft and wearable Moroccan leather.

Here at The Stellar Boutique we purchase our bags directly from the craftsmen of Morocco and are therefore able to ensure a fair trade policy and conduct. We work together to bring you distinctive North African delights straight from the emporia and delivered directly to your door!

As always, our leather boho bags are exclusive to The Stellar Boutique, guaranteeing free spirited individuals unique fashion that cannot be found elsewhere!

New Boho Bags!
New Boho Bags!

Boho Moroccan Kaftans Back In Stock!

Here at The Stellar Boutique we are celebrating the beginning of summer and, of course, festival season by bringing in a touch of the exotic with our hot array of Moroccan kaftans that are now back in stock.

The perfect summer essential to add a touch of bohemian glam, these gorgeous kaftan dresses are the genuine article, sourced from deep within the souks of the enchanted city of Marrakech. Each one has a traditional Moroccan embroidered trim and with the distinctive Arabian design on the front and back these kaftans have a true authenticity that won’t be found in your average high street store.

Incredibly versatile, these kaftans are an essential ‘must-have’ in every individuals’ holiday wardrobe. Perfect for throwing over your sun-kissed bod on the beach, they provide ideal protection from the sun but are loose, airy and light enough to keep you cool whilst making a style statement at the same!

Alternatively, team them with a boho belt, some gladiator sandals and a tassel bag and ‘Rock the Kasbah’ for the ultimate festival look for summer 2014.

Or simply wear yours to potter about in at home or the garden on those lazy, bohemian afternoons!

Either way, these kaftans are perfect for that super stylish, exotic summer cool.

Because we purchase our kaftans directly from the artisans of Morocco, we are able to ensure a fair trade policy. Working together to bring you unique North African delights straight out of the souks and delivered directly to your door.

As always, these beautiful kaftans are exclusive to The Stellar Boutique, guaranteeing you stylish and original fashion that cannot be found anywhere else!

Moroccan Kaftans, Back In Stock!
Moroccan Kaftans, Back In Stock!

Nothing less than full victory

“Nothing is ever really new in fashion… As you go back in time you would gradually find the predecessors of every ‘New’ Look.”

Seventy years ago an estimated 160,000-allied troops crossed the English Channel in an initial D-Day assault on 6th June 1944 from Portsmouth, the preeminent departure point for troops bound for Sword Beach. An attack of which not only paved the way for the defeat of Nazi Germany, but evoked the loss of approximately 2,500 allied troops in the ensue of battle. As the anniversary of the D-Day landings are being commemorated by hundreds of last surviving veterans on both sides of the English channel this weekend, we wanted to take a look at the cumbersome affect of a nation devastated by chaos and mass destruction spanning over a grueling six years of war on the fashion industry.

D-Day Operation Neptune, Channel 4
D-Day Operation Neptune, Channel 4

In an era of desolation and ruin, communities grew to connect in abutment, the populace developing economical measures and thus demonstrating the upmost creativity and ingenuity as a result of the worldwide rationing of textiles imposed in 1940 thus forcing women to dress in a practical and versatile manner, using up as little material as possible and those of synthetic nature, like viscose and nylon. In Britain coupons were introduced where people could exchange clothes for food, with the Board of Trade controlling suppliers and fronting the campaign “Make do and Mend,” encouraging society to recycle clothes and produce makeshift clothing until 1943.  Coinciding with this, the utility scheme was introduced, providing minimum quality clothing for a highly unreasonable price.  Inspired by the term “old dress, new hat,” women began to make hats from newsprint as well as turbans in 1942, made from veiling, ribbons and other less-restricted materials resulting in the decrease in hat sales. A different story in Paris, women were infuriated by rationing, taking revenge by wearing the most enormous hats, piled with bizarre decoration! People made whatever use they could of materials they could maintain, consequently inventing the “peasant” skirt, a patchwork skirt made from an array of useful materials in terms of fabric and ribbon that was to be sewn together in patchwork squares.  A trend featured heavily on the Autumn Winter 2014/15 catwalks by the likes of Phillip Lim, who cartoon brights and whimsical inspiration as opposed to his harsher, streetwise influences. Parisian couturiers presented lines with suggestive titles like ‘False Alarm’ and ‘Attack,’ featuring military jackets and gas masks in the bag while Pierre Balmain presented evening gowns named ‘Occupation’ and ‘Underground,’ – a trend cropping up on the European catwalks this Fall with Fendi’s swish/grandeur combination of heavy duty, stiff wool parkas and army jackets and bomber jacket rendered dresses coinciding with Versace’s upright tailored jackets featuring fringed epaulettes and ceremonial buttons.

photo 1.PNG
Junya Watanabe Autumn Winter 2014/15
photo 2.PNG-2
Phillip Lim Autumn Winter 2014/15

Our absolute favourite look of Autumn Winter 2014/15 is that of Zadig & Voltaire, with creative director Cecilia Bönström describing the collection as a “A military winter with a bohemian feel,” encompassing androgynous masculine and feminine clashes of lace, sequins and utilitarian jackets.

Zadig & Voltaire Autumn Winter 2014/15
Zadig & Voltaire Autumn Winter 2014/15

Whilst the likes of Lucien Lelong was petitioning against the abolishment of the industry all together in Paris during the Occupation, in Britain, British Vogue was still regularly inundated, though focusing on informing women how to get the “modern makeshift” look as opposed to the next buy, with photographers like Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) making the most out of war scenes in a light humoured, rebellious manner as a source of entertainment, as well as inspiration and respect for the men of Britain at war – as well as Lee Miller, a fashion photographer who focused on women after the war. Amongst a time of desperation and despair, women were still constantly under pressure to look their best at all times in case their husbands were to return from the battle fields, though still undertaking war work which was often incredibly strenuous and dangerous.  The Hollywood ‘Golden Age’ stars were therefore tremendously influential, those of which all women aspired to be – Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo, Rita Hayworth, Jean Harlow and Jean Crawford to name but a few, were actresses turned models for women everywhere, who, before Vogue, drew all fashion inspiration from the Silver screen. Americans were buying haute couture from Paris, replicating and making tons of copies, leading the world into mass production and clothing in standardised sizes, introducing us to the world of ready-to-wear and as Paris lost its position as the epicentre of fashion towards the end of World War II, London and New York designers began to establish opportunities, with American Designers starting to gain confidence therefore putting their name on their designs.

photo 1
Cecil Beaton
photo 2.PNG
Cecil Beaton

In 1947, one of the most revolutionary lines in fashion history, the ‘Corelle’ line (named from a vision of huge skirts spreading like ‘petal cups’ from fitted bodices) was presented, revealing an entirely new image for women after the war, constituting of full blown hips, neat shoulders and slim waists and contradictory exceeding a vast amount of material and freeing the imagination from years of rationing.  Christian Dior was greatly disturbed at the new fashions women sported throughout the war, stating that “everything about their attire spelt misery, suffering and sham – clunky shoes with cork wedge-heels, a fake stocking seam drawn skilfully onto the leg, short skirts with a split, and on top of it all a harsh square-cut jacket.” He wanted to abolish the profound effect the war had on women, emphasising the beautiful femininity and elegance that had surrounding the female population pre-war.  Hemlines were dramatically dropped nine inches, made from contrasting, flimsy wartime materials in velvet, taffeta and satin and using hip padding and boned, bustier-style bodices, creating the ‘hourglass’ silhouette with the neat, sloped shoulders featuring in the first collection of Dior’s former colleague, Balmain in 1945. After achieving worldwide population in a very short period of time, this line was deemed the ‘New Look.’ However, such lavish and elegant style did not go opposed, on a visit to the states in 1947, Christian Dior came up against expressive play cards when arriving in Chicago, stating “Christian Dior, go home!” of which he joked “it was as if we had narrowly escaped an assassination attempt.” On another occasion, a Dior model was attacked by housewives on the Rue Lepic in Paris.  Not phased, Dior’s luxurious and elegant sculpture structures went on to influence countless designers and has since secured the continuation of Maison Dior. Combining Christian Dior’s classic ‘New Look’ and Cristobel Balenciaga’s 1950s ‘Sack,’ such monumental silhouettes have found themselves in the full front of fashion over past seasons, with Proenza Schouler paying homage with preppy crepe jackets and metallic midi’s for Spring Summer 2014.

photo 5.PNG
Christian Dior’s ‘New Look,’ 1947
photo 4.PNG
John Galliano’s interpretation of Christian Dior’s ‘Corelle’ line
photo 3.PNG-2
Proenza Schouler Spring Summer 2014

View our full collection of 1940s vintage clothing here or at www.thestellarboutique.com.

1943 Vintage Original M43 Womens US Army Jacket
1943 Vintage Original M43 Womens US Army Jacket